May 22, 2018
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The Florida Statutes

The 2010 Florida Statutes(including Special Session A)

Title XLVII
CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND CORRECTIONS
Chapter 951
COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL PRISONERS
View Entire Chapter
CHAPTER 951
CHAPTER 951
COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL PRISONERS
951.01 County prisoners may be put to labor.
951.03 County commissioners to provide food, etc.
951.032 Financial responsibility for medical expenses.
951.033 Income and assets; payment of subsistence costs.
951.04 Furnishing of transportation to discharged prisoners.
951.05 Working county prisoners on roads and bridges or other public works of the county; hiring out to another county.
951.06 Employment of correctional officers; duties; salary.
951.061 Designation of sheriff as chief correctional officer; duties.
951.062 Contractual arrangements for operation and maintenance of county detention facilities.
951.0623 Application of ch. 86-183; agreement or contract as of July 1, 1986.
951.063 Privately operated county correctional facilities.
951.08 Prisoner workday.
951.10 Leasing prisoners to work for private interests prohibited.
951.11 Turning prisoners over to board of bond trustees, etc.
951.12 Working prisoners on public roads and exchange of prisoners between counties.
951.13 Transferring from one county to another.
951.14 Failure of person to discharge his or her duty; penalty.
951.15 Credit on fines and costs.
951.16 Prisoners entitled to receive credit on fine based on imprisonment.
951.175 Provision of programs for women.
951.176 Provision of education programs for youth.
951.19 Interference with county prisoners.
951.21 Gain-time for good conduct for county prisoners.
951.22 County detention facilities; contraband articles.
951.221 Sexual misconduct between detention facility employees and inmates; penalties.
951.23 County and municipal detention facilities; definitions; administration; standards and requirements.
951.231 County residential probation program.
951.24 Extend the limits of confinement for county prisoners.
951.25 Sale of goods and services produced by county prisoners.
951.26 Public safety coordinating councils.
951.27 Blood tests of inmates.
951.28 Transmitting prisoner information to reduce public assistance fraud.
951.29 Procedure for requesting restoration of civil rights of county prisoners convicted of felonies.
951.01 County prisoners may be put to labor.The board of county commissioners of each county may employ all persons in the jail of their respective counties under sentence upon conviction for crime at labor upon the roads, bridges, or other public works of the county where they are so imprisoned, or on other projects for which the governing body of the county could otherwise lawfully expend public funds and which it determines to be necessary for the health, safety, and welfare of the county.
History.s. 1, ch. 2090, 1877; RS 3032; GS 4109; s. 1, ch. 5705, 1907; s. 1, ch. 5963, 1909; RGS 6217; s. 1, ch. 7323, 1917; s. 1, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8549; s. 44, ch. 57-121; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 18, ch. 61-530; ss. 19, 35, ch. 69-106; ss. 1, 2, ch. 70-441; s. 92, ch. 77-120; s. 111, ch. 79-3; s. 2, ch. 94-149; s. 28, ch. 96-312.
951.03 County commissioners to provide food, etc.Boards of county commissioners, when working county prisoners on the public works of the counties shall provide, or cause to be provided, substantial food, clothes, shoes, medical attention, etc., for said prisoners as are required for state prisoners in the state.
History.s. 1, ch. 2090, 1877; RS 3032; GS 4109; s. 1, ch. 5705, 1907; s. 1, ch. 5963, 1909; RGS 6217; s. 1, ch. 7323, 1917; s. 1, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8549; s. 1, ch. 61-488.
951.032 Financial responsibility for medical expenses.
(1) A county detention facility or municipal detention facility incurring expenses for providing medical care, treatment, hospitalization, or transportation may seek reimbursement for the expenses incurred in the following order:
(a) From the prisoner or person receiving medical care, treatment, hospitalization, or transportation by deducting the cost from the prisoner’s cash account on deposit with the detention facility. If the prisoner’s cash account does not contain sufficient funds to cover medical care, treatment, hospitalization, or transportation, then the detention facility may place a lien against the prisoner’s cash account or other personal property, to provide payment in the event sufficient funds become available at a later time. Any existing lien may be carried over to future incarceration of the same prisoner as long as the future incarceration takes place within the county originating the lien and the future incarceration takes place within 3 years of the date the lien was placed against the prisoner’s account or other personal property.
(b) From an insurance company, health care corporation, or other source if the prisoner or person is covered by an insurance policy or subscribes to a health care corporation or other source for those expenses.
(2) A prisoner who receives medical care, treatment, hospitalization, or transportation shall cooperate with the county detention facility or municipal detention facility in seeking reimbursement under paragraphs(1)(a) and (b) for expenses incurred by the facility for the prisoner. A prisoner who willfully refuses to cooperate with the reimbursement efforts of the detention facility may have a lien placed against the prisoner’s cash account or other personal property and may not receive gain-time as provided by s. 951.21.
History.s. 2, ch. 83-189; s. 45, ch. 95-283.
951.033 Income and assets; payment of subsistence costs.
(1) The Legislature finds that there is an urgent need to alleviate the increasing financial burdens on local subdivisions of the state caused by the expenses of incarcerating prisoners. In addition to a prisoner’s cash account on deposit in local detention facilities, many prisoners have sources of income and assets outside of the facility, which may include bank accounts, inheritances, real estate, social security payments, veteran’s payments, and other types of financial resources.
(2) The local detention facility shall determine the financial status of prisoners for the purpose of paying from their income and assets all or a fair portion of their daily subsistence costs. In determining the financial status of prisoners, any income exempt by state or federal law shall be excluded. Consideration shall be given to the prisoner’s ability to pay, the liability or potential liability of the prisoner to the victim or guardian or the estate of the victim, and his or her dependents.
(3) The chief correctional officer of a local subdivision may direct a prisoner to pay for all or a fair portion of daily subsistence costs. A prisoner is entitled to reasonable advance notice of the assessment and shall be afforded an opportunity to present reasons for opposition to the assessment.
(4) An order from the chief correctional officer directing payment of all or a fair portion of a prisoner’s daily subsistence costs may survive against the estate of the sentenced prisoner.
(5) The chief correctional officer may seek payment for the prisoner’s subsistence costs from:
(a) The prisoner’s cash account on deposit at the facility; or
(b) A civil restitution lien on the prisoner’s cash account on deposit at the facility or on other personal property.
(6) If the prisoner’s cash account at the local detention facility does not contain sufficient funds to cover subsistence costs, the chief correctional officer may place a civil restitution lien against the prisoner’s cash account or other personal property. A civil restitution lien may continue for a period of 3 years and applies to the cash account of any prisoner who is reincarcerated within the county in which the civil restitution lien was originated.
History.s. 21, ch. 96-312.
951.04 Furnishing of transportation to discharged prisoners.When a prisoner is discharged by reasons of having served his or her sentence, or upon receiving a pardon or parole, he or she shall be furnished transportation, or its equivalent in money, back to the place from which the prisoner was sentenced.
History.s. 1, ch. 2090, 1877; RS 3032; GS 4109; s. 1, ch. 5705, 1907; s. 1, ch. 5963, 1909; RGS 6217; s. 1, ch. 7323, 1917; s. 1, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8549; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 1695, ch. 97-102; s. 1, ch. 99-361.
951.05 Working county prisoners on roads and bridges or other public works of the county; hiring out to another county.The board of county commissioners of the several counties may require all county prisoners under sentence confined in the jail of their respective counties for any offense to labor upon the public roads, bridges, farms, or other public works owned and operated by the county, or on other projects for which the governing body of the county could otherwise lawfully expend public funds and which it determines to be necessary for the health, safety, and welfare of the county, or in the event the county commissioners of any county deem it to the best interest of their county, they may hire out their prisoners to any other county in the state to be worked upon the public roads, bridges, or other public works of that county, or on other projects for which the governing body of that county could otherwise lawfully expend public funds and which it determines to be necessary for the health, safety, and welfare of that county, or they may, upon such terms as may be agreed upon between themselves and the Department of Transportation, lease or let said prisoners to the department instead of keeping them in the county jail where they are sentenced. The money derived from the hire of such prisoners shall be paid to the county hiring out such prisoners and placed to the credit of the fine and forfeiture fund of the county.
History.s. 13, ch. 6537, 1913; RGS 6218; s. 2, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8550; s. 1, ch. 61-488; ss. 23, 35, ch. 69-106; s. 3, ch. 94-149; s. 121, ch. 99-385.
951.06 Employment of correctional officers; duties; salary.
(1) The county commissioners shall designate a chief correctional officer and such correctional officers as they deem necessary.
(2) All chief correctional officers of prisoners shall see that all rules and regulations prescribed by law or the department are fully observed and complied with; enforce discipline among the prisoners in and about the camps; and administer punishment to prisoners, when in their judgment the same is necessary in order to enforce proper discipline, conforming always to the law and rules and regulations.
(3) All boards of county commissioners shall immediately discharge any correctional officer who shall be guilty of gross negligence or cruel and inhuman treatment of prisoners under their control and their action shall be final.
(4) The salaries of correctional officers provided for in this chapter shall be fixed by the board of county commissioners, and the chief correctional officer shall be furnished means of transportation over the roads of the county when necessary, the upkeep and operation of which shall be furnished by the county; however, the county shall not in any case be required to furnish a driver of such conveyance where such services are required to be paid for.
(5) All salaries contemplated by this chapter shall be paid from the general revenue fund of the county.
History.s. 13, ch. 6537, 1913; RGS 6218; s. 2, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8550; s. 44, ch. 57-121; ss. 1, 2, ch. 61-198; s. 18, ch. 61-530; ss. 19, 35, ch. 69-106; ss. 1, 2, ch. 70-441; s. 94, ch. 77-120; s. 113, ch. 79-3; s. 2, ch. 86-183; s. 29, ch. 96-312.
951.061 Designation of sheriff as chief correctional officer; duties.
(1) Upon adoption of an ordinance by a majority of the county commission, the sheriff may be designated the chief correctional officer of the county correctional system, and the sheriff shall appoint such officers as he or she deems necessary.
(2) If designated, the sheriff or his or her designee shall enforce all existing state law concerning the operation and maintenance of county jails.
(3) The salaries for county correctional officers shall be paid from the general revenue fund of the county and shall be included by the sheriff, if designated as chief correctional officer of the county, in his or her proposed budget of expenditures for the maintenance and operation of the county correctional system as provided in s. 30.49.
History.s. 3, ch. 86-183; s. 30, ch. 96-312; s. 1879, ch. 97-102.
951.062 Contractual arrangements for operation and maintenance of county detention facilities.
(1) After consultation with the sheriff and upon adoption of an ordinance by vote of a majority plus one, the governing body of the county may enter into a contract with a private entity for the provision of the operation and maintenance of a county detention facility as defined in s. 951.23(1)(a) and the supervision of county prisoners. The contract may designate a representative from a private entity as the chief correctional officer pursuant to s. 951.061.
(2) The contract term shall be determined by the negotiating parties.
(3) Any private entity entering into a contract with the board of county commissioners pursuant to the provisions of s. 951.061 shall be liable in tort with respect to the care and custody of county prisoners under its supervision and for any breach of contract with the board of county commissioners.
(4) Any private entity entering into a contract with the board of county commissioners pursuant to the provisions of s. 951.061 shall allow law enforcement officers access to persons detained within the county detention facility for the purpose of conducting criminal investigations.
(5) In the case of a county prisoner’s willful failure to remain within the supervisory control of the private entity, such action shall constitute an escape, punishable as provided in s. 944.40.
(6) Private correctional officers responsible for supervising inmates within the facility shall meet the requirements necessary for certification by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission pursuant to s. 943.1395. However, expenses for such training shall be the responsibility of the private entity.
(7) After consultation with the sheriff, the county shall appoint a contract monitor who shall be responsible for documenting adherence to the contract and compliance with rules, policies, procedures, and performance standards established by the local governing body.
(8) The contract shall require an annual audit of the private entity’s operation of the county detention facility or facilities.
(9) When a county enters into a contract for the operation and maintenance of county detention facilities, the sheriff of such county shall cease to be liable for actions arising out of the operation and maintenance of the facilities under contract, except as to any acts he or she commits personally.
History.s. 4, ch. 86-183; s. 6, ch. 91-225; s. 2, ch. 94-168; s. 1696, ch. 97-102.
951.0623 Application of ch. 86-183; agreement or contract as of July 1, 1986.Notwithstanding any other provision of chapter 86-183, Laws of Florida, each correctional facility and county detention facility operated and maintained by either the sheriff or by a contractual private entity on the effective date of this act may continue to be operated and maintained in accordance with any current agreement or contract; however, should such agreement or contract ever be terminated, the provisions of chapter 86-183, Laws of Florida, shall thereafter apply.
History.s. 9, ch. 86-183.
951.063 Privately operated county correctional facilities.Each private correctional officer employed by a private entity under contract to a county commission must be certified as a correctional officer under s. 943.1395 and must meet the minimum qualifications established in s. 943.13. The county shall provide to the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission all necessary fingerprints for Florida Department of Law Enforcement and Federal Bureau of Investigation background checks. The Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission shall advise the county as to those employees whose certification has been denied or revoked. Neither the county nor the private entity shall be the direct recipient of criminal records.
History.s. 5, ch. 86-183.
951.08 Prisoner workday.No prisoner shall be compelled to labor more than 10 hours per day nor be subject to punishment for any refusal to labor beyond such limit; provided, that the 10 hours shall be the time embraced from the leaving to the return of the prisoner to his or her place of detention.
History.s. 13, ch. 6537, 1913; RGS 6218; s. 2, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8550; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 1697, ch. 97-102.
951.10 Leasing prisoners to work for private interests prohibited.County prisoners may not be leased to work for any private interests. This section does not prohibit county inmates from working in nonprofit and private sector jobs pursuant to s. 951.24(2) and consistent with federal law.
History.s. 3, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8551; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 17, ch. 2001-110.
951.11 Turning prisoners over to board of bond trustees, etc.The board of county commissioners in counties where a board of bond trustees, board of public works, or other duly constituted board, has charge of the construction and maintenance of the public roads may turn the county prisoners over to the said trustees to be worked on the public roads of said county, subject to all the rules and regulations herein provided.
History.s. 4, ch. 9203, 1923; CGL 8552; s. 1, ch. 61-488.
951.12 Working prisoners on public roads and exchange of prisoners between counties.All persons confined in the county jail under sentence of a court may be worked on the roads of the county. In case the number of prisoners in any county at any time be less than five, the county commissioners of such county may arrange with the county commissioners of any other county for an exchange of prisoners. The county commissioners shall not be required to work the prisoners on the public roads when there is no contract between the counties as provided herein, nor when in their judgment the number of prisoners is insufficient to justify the employment of a correctional officer to work them.
History.s. 4, ch. 4769, 1899; GS 4110; RGS 6219; CGL 8553; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 46, ch. 95-283.
951.13 Transferring from one county to another.
(1) When the county commissioners of any county shall have made provision for the expenses of supporting and guarding, while at work on the public roads, a larger number of prisoners than can be supplied from that county, upon the application of the county commissioners of such county, the county commissioners of any other county which has not otherwise provided for the working of its prisoners or otherwise disposed of its prisoners, or may hereafter dispose of its prisoners, shall deliver to said county or counties applying for same, in the order of their application, such prisoners as may be confined in the county jail or hereafter be sentenced to such county jail.
(2) Provided, that the cost of guarding and maintaining such prisoners shall be paid by the county applying for and receiving the same and any and all such prisoners from such other counties may at any time be returned to the sheriff of such other counties at the expense of the county having received and used them; provided, further, that no prisoners shall be sent out of the county in which they have been convicted and sentenced to work to any other county unless a contract for that purpose shall have been entered into by the boards of county commissioners of the respective counties, and arrangements made for their safekeeping, proper care, and safe return by the employing counties to the county or counties from which such prisoners were sentenced.
History.s. 5, ch. 4769, 1899; GS 4111; RGS 6220; CGL 8554; s. 1, ch. 61-488.
951.14 Failure of person to discharge his or her duty; penalty.Any person appointed by virtue of the laws of the state relative to working county prisoners on the public road, or to whom duties are assigned in this chapter, who shall fail to make complete return within the time specified therein, or who shall otherwise fail to discharge the duties imposed upon him or her by this chapter, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
History.s. 8, ch. 4769, 1899; GS 4112; RGS 6221; CGL 8555; s. 7, ch. 29615, 1955; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 1180, ch. 71-136; s. 1698, ch. 97-102.
951.15 Credit on fines and costs.Every working prisoner shall be entitled to receive, together with subsistence, a credit at the rate of 30 cents per diem, on account of fines and costs adjudged against him or her.
History.s. 2, ch. 2090, 1877; RS 3033; GS 4113; RGS 6222; CGL 8556; s. 1, ch. 61-488; s. 1699, ch. 97-102.
951.16 Prisoners entitled to receive credit on fine based on imprisonment.Every person who may be imprisoned in the county jail for failure to pay a fine and costs, or either, under sentence imposed upon conviction for crime shall be entitled to receive, together with subsistence, a credit on such fine and costs, or either, as the case may be, in proportion to the time such person may be imprisoned.
History.s. 1, ch. 6176, 1911; RGS 6223; CGL 8557.
951.175 Provision of programs for women.
(1) This section may be cited as the “County Corrections Equality Act.”
(2) All regularly employed assistants, officers, and employees whose duties bring them into contact with the inmates of the institution shall be women as far as practicable.
(3) Women inmates shall have access to programs of education, vocational training, rehabilitation, and substance abuse treatment that are equivalent to those programs which are provided for male inmates. The county shall ensure that women inmates are given opportunities for exercise, recreation, and visitation privileges according to the same standards as those privileges are provided for men. Women inmates shall be given opportunities to participate in work-release programs which are comparable to the opportunities provided for male inmates and shall be eligible for early release according to the same standards and procedures under which male inmates are eligible for early release.
(4) An inmate who is pregnant shall be provided with prenatal care and medical treatment for the duration of her pregnancy. The county shall ensure that a pregnant inmate receives supplemental food and clothing and is excused from inappropriate work assignments. An inmate shall be transferred to a hospital outside the detention facility grounds if a condition develops which is beyond the scope and capabilities of the county detention center’s medical facilities.
(5) Any woman inmate who gives birth to a child during her term of imprisonment may be temporarily taken to a hospital outside the detention facility for the purpose of childbirth, and the charge for hospital and medical care shall be charged against the funds allocated to the detention facility. The county shall provide for the care of any child so born and shall pay for the child’s care until the child is suitably placed outside the prison system.
History.s. 2, ch. 91-195; s. 30, ch. 91-225.
951.176 Provision of education programs for youth.Minors who have not graduated from high school and eligible students with disabilities under the age of 22 who have not graduated with a standard diploma or its equivalent who are detained in a county or municipal detention facility as defined in s. 951.23 shall be offered educational services by the local school district in which the facility is located. These educational services shall be based upon the estimated length of time the youth will be in the facility and the youth’s current level of functioning. School district superintendents or their designees shall be notified by the county sheriff or chief correctional officer, or his or her designee, upon the assignment of a youth under the age of 21 to the facility. A cooperative agreement with the local school district and applicable law enforcement units shall be developed to address the notification requirement and the provision of educational services to these youth.
History.s. 11, ch. 2000-137.
951.19 Interference with county prisoners.Whoever shall interfere with county prisoners while at work, at their meals, at rest, or while going to and from their quarters or with the correctional officers in charge of them, either by assaulting them or by inciting them or attempting to incite the prisoners to disobedience, revolt, or escape, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.083.
History.s. 2, ch. 4391, 1895; GS 3508; RGS 5394; CGL 7533; s. 1181, ch. 71-136; s. 47, ch. 95-283.
951.21 Gain-time for good conduct for county prisoners.
(1) Commutation of time for good conduct of county prisoners shall be granted by the board of county commissioners unless, by a majority vote of the board of county commissioners, the board elects to discontinue or revise gain-time policies for good conduct. If the board of commissioners authorizes commutation of time for good conduct, the following deductions shall be made from the term of sentence when no charge of misconduct has been sustained against a county prisoner: up to 5 days per month off the first and second years of the sentence; up to 10 days per month off the third and fourth years of the sentence; up to 15 days per month off the fifth and all succeeding years of the sentence. Where no charge of misconduct is sustained against a county prisoner, the deduction shall be deemed earned and the prisoner shall be entitled to credit for a month as soon as the prisoner has served such time as, when added to the deduction allowable, will equal a month. A county prisoner under two or more cumulative sentences shall be allowed commutation as if they were all one sentence.
(2) For each sustained charge of escape or attempted escape, mutinous conduct, or other serious misconduct, all the commutation which shall have accrued in favor of a county prisoner up to that day shall be forfeited, except that in case of escape if the prisoner voluntarily returns without expense to the state or county then such forfeiture may be set aside by the board of county commissioners if in its judgment the prisoner’s subsequent conduct entitles him or her thereto.
(3) The board of county commissioners, upon recommendation of the warden or sheriff, may adopt a policy to allow for county prisoners, in addition to time credits, an extra good-time allowance for meritorious conduct or exceptional industry not to exceed 5 days per month.
(4) All or any part of the gain-time earned by a county prisoner and any extra gain-time allowed him or her, if any, shall be subject to forfeiture by the board of county commissioners upon recommendation of the sheriff or warden for violation of any law of the state or any rule or regulation of the board or institution.
History.s. 23, ch. 3883, 1889; RS 3059; GS 4140; s. 1, ch. 6177, 1911; s. 1, ch. 6917, 1915; RGS 6231; CGL 8567; s. 1, ch. 18065, 1937; s. 1, ch. 19199, 1939; s. 1, ch. 25210, 1949; s. 1, ch. 28300, 1953; s. 1, ch. 61-347; s. 1, ch. 65-220; ss. 19, 35, ch. 69-106; ss. 1, 2, ch. 70-441; s. 98, ch. 77-120; s. 501, ch. 81-259; s. 1700, ch. 97-102; s. 2, ch. 99-361.
Note.Former s. 954.06.
951.22 County detention facilities; contraband articles.
(1) It is unlawful, except through regular channels as duly authorized by the sheriff or officer in charge, to introduce into or possess upon the grounds of any county detention facility as defined in s. 951.23 or to give to or receive from any inmate of any such facility wherever said inmate is located at the time or to take or to attempt to take or send therefrom any of the following articles which are hereby declared to be contraband for the purposes of this act, to wit: Any written or recorded communication; any currency or coin; any article of food or clothing; any tobacco products as defined in s. 210.25(11); any cigarette as defined in s. 210.01(1); any cigar; any intoxicating beverage or beverage which causes or may cause an intoxicating effect; any narcotic, hypnotic, or excitative drug or drug of any kind or nature, including nasal inhalators, sleeping pills, barbiturates, and controlled substances as defined in s. 893.02(4); any firearm or any instrumentality customarily used or which is intended to be used as a dangerous weapon; and any instrumentality of any nature that may be or is intended to be used as an aid in effecting or attempting to effect an escape from a county facility.
(2) Whoever violates subsection (1) shall be guilty of a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084.
History.s. 1, ch. 63-140; s. 1182, ch. 71-136; s. 180, ch. 71-355; s. 33, ch. 74-112; s. 1, ch. 78-41; s. 78, ch. 87-226; s. 6, ch. 91-225; s. 4, ch. 94-149.
951.221 Sexual misconduct between detention facility employees and inmates; penalties.
(1) Any employee of a county or municipal detention facility or of a private detention facility under contract with a county commission who engages in sexual misconduct, as defined in s. 944.35(3)(b)1., with an inmate or an offender supervised by the facility without committing the crime of sexual battery commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. The consent of an inmate to any act of sexual misconduct may not be raised as a defense to prosecution under this section.
(2) Notwithstanding prosecution, any violation of this section, as determined by the administrator of the facility, constitutes sufficient cause for dismissal of the violator from employment, and such person may not again be employed in any capacity in connection with the correctional system.
History.s. 3, ch. 2001-92.
951.23 County and municipal detention facilities; definitions; administration; standards and requirements.
(1) DEFINITIONS.As used in this section, the term:
(a) “County detention facility” means a county jail, a county stockade, a county work camp, a county residential probation center, and any other place except a municipal detention facility used by a county or county officer for the detention of persons charged with or convicted of either felony or misdemeanor.
(b) “County residential probation center” means a county-operated facility housing offenders serving misdemeanor sentences or first-time felony sentences. Such facilities shall provide or contract for the provision of the programs established under s. 951.231.
(c) “County prisoner” means a person who is detained in a county detention facility by reason of being charged with or convicted of either felony or misdemeanor.
(d) “Municipal detention facility” means a city jail, a city stockade, a city prison camp, and any other place except a county detention facility used by a municipality or municipal officer for the detention of persons charged with or convicted of violation of municipal laws or ordinances.
(e) “Municipal prisoner” means a person who is detained in a municipal detention facility by reason of being charged with or convicted of violation of municipal law or ordinance.
(f) “Reduced custody housing area” means that area of a county detention facility or municipal detention facility which is designed to hold a large number of prisoners in a dormitory or barracks-type setting. The area may or may not have a security exterior, limited access, or exterior walls constructed of canvas, cloth, or any material similarly flexible or woven, which is flame resistant and is supported by a structural frame of metal or similar durable material.
(2) COLLECTION OF INFORMATION.In conjunction with the administrators of county detention facilities, the Department of Corrections shall develop an instrument for the collection of information from the administrator of each county detention facility. Whenever possible, the information shall be transmitted by the administrator to the Department of Corrections electronically or in a computer readable format. The information shall be provided on a monthly basis and shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
(a) The number of persons housed per day who are:
1. Felons sentenced to cumulative sentences of incarceration of 364 days or less.
2. Felons sentenced to cumulative sentences of incarceration of 365 days or more.
3. Sentenced misdemeanants.
4. Awaiting trial on at least one felony charge.
5. Awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges only.
6. Convicted felons and misdemeanants who are awaiting sentencing.
7. Juveniles.
8. State parole violators.
9. State inmates who were transferred from a state correctional facility, as defined in s. 944.02, to the county detention facility.
(b) The number of persons housed per day, admitted per month, and housed on the last day of the month, by age, race, sex, country of citizenship, country of birth, and immigration status classified as one of the following:
1. Permanent legal resident of the United States.
2. Legal visitor.
3. Undocumented or illegal alien.
4. Unknown status.
(c) The number of persons housed per day:
1. Pursuant to part I of chapter 394, “The Florida Mental Health Act.”
2. Pursuant to chapter 397, “Substance Abuse Services.”
(d) The cost per day for housing a person in the county detention facility.
(e) The number of persons admitted per month, and the number of persons housed on the last day of the month, by age, race, and sex, who are:
1. Felons sentenced to cumulative sentences of incarceration of 364 days or less.
2. Felons sentenced to cumulative sentences of incarceration of 365 days or more.
3. Sentenced misdemeanants.
4. Awaiting trial on at least one felony charge.
5. Awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges only.
6. Convicted felons and misdemeanants who are awaiting sentencing.
7. Juveniles.
8. State parole violators.
9. State inmates who were transferred from a state correctional facility, as defined in s. 944.02, to the county detention facility.
(f) The number of persons admitted per month, by age, race, and sex:
1. Pursuant to part I of chapter 394, “The Florida Mental Health Act.”
2. Pursuant to chapter 397, “Substance Abuse Services.”
(3) ANALYSIS AND USE OF INFORMATION; LISTS OF CONSTRUCTION PLANS.The information shall be analyzed and evaluated by the Department of Corrections for comparisons of various categories between counties and may be used for the provision of technical assistance, upon request of the chief correctional officer. Such assistance may include, but is not limited to, enhancement of existing pretrial intervention programs and state reimbursement for operational, renovation, or construction costs for county detention facilities.
(4) STANDARDS FOR SHERIFFS AND CHIEF CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS.
(a) There shall be established a five-member working group consisting of three persons appointed by the Florida Sheriffs Association and two persons appointed by the Florida Association of Counties to develop model standards for county and municipal detention facilities. By October 1, 1996, each sheriff and chief correctional officer shall adopt, at a minimum, the model standards with reference to:
1.a. The construction, equipping, maintenance, and operation of county and municipal detention facilities.
b. The cleanliness and sanitation of county and municipal detention facilities; the number of county and municipal prisoners who may be housed therein per specified unit of floor space; the quality, quantity, and supply of bedding furnished to such prisoners; the quality, quantity, and diversity of food served to them and the manner in which it is served; the furnishing to them of medical attention and health and comfort items; and the disciplinary treatment which may be meted out to them.

Notwithstanding the provisions of the otherwise applicable building code, a reduced custody housing area may be occupied by inmates or may be used for sleeping purposes as allowed in subsection (7). The sheriff or chief correctional officer shall provide that a reduced custody housing area shall be governed by fire and life safety standards which do not interfere with the normal use of the facility and which affect a reasonable degree of compliance with rules of the State Fire Marshal for correctional facilities.

2. The confinement of prisoners by classification and providing, whenever possible, for classifications which separate males from females, juveniles from adults, felons from misdemeanants, and those awaiting trial from those convicted and, in addition, providing for the separation of special risk prisoners, such as the mentally ill, alcohol or narcotic addicts, sex deviates, suicide risks, and any other classification which the local unit may deem necessary for the safety of the prisoners and the operation of the facility pursuant to degree of risk and danger criteria. Nondangerous felons may be housed with misdemeanants.
(b) A county or municipal detention facility which stocks medicinal drugs in quantities other than individual prescriptions must obtain the services of a consultant pharmacist or dispensing physician and comply with the licensing requirements of chapter 465. A facility which has a valid license pursuant to chapter 465 shall have that part of its medical services relating to procedures for the safe handling and storage of medicinal drugs exempt from the inspection requirements of this section. A facility which maintains only individual prescriptions dispensed by a licensed pharmacist is not required to be licensed under chapter 465.
(5) FIRESAFETY INSPECTIONS.The managing body of the county or municipal detention facility shall contract for the firesafety inspections of such facilities. The inspections must be performed by personnel certified by the State Fire Marshal’s office as firesafety inspectors and must be performed at least once annually.
(6) REMOVAL OF PRISONERS TO ANOTHER COUNTY OR MUNICIPALITY.
(a) When a court finds that county or municipal prisoners are detained in a county or municipal detention facility that does not meet minimum standards and requirements, the court may order the prisoners, or any part of them, removed to and confined in a county or municipal detention facility that does meet such standards and requirements, whether it is in the same county or municipality or in some other county or municipality.
(b) The expense of maintaining prisoners removed to another county or municipality under the provisions of paragraph (a) shall be borne by the county or municipality from which they are removed.
(c) Promptly upon the making of any order authorized by paragraph (a), copies thereof shall be sent to the officer in charge of the county or municipal detention facility from which the county or municipal prisoners affected by such order are required to be removed, to the board of county commissioners of the county or the city commissioners of the municipality in which such county or municipal detention facility is situated, and to the officer in charge of the county or municipal detention facility to which they are required to be removed. If the order requires the removal of county or municipal prisoners to a county or municipal detention facility in another county or municipality, a copy thereof shall also be promptly sent to the board of county commissioners of the county, or the city commissioners of the municipality, in which it is situated.
(7) USE OF REDUCED CUSTODY HOUSING AREA.Any county detention facility or municipal detention facility may provide for the custody on a temporary basis in a reduced custody housing area of sentenced or unsentenced misdemeanants, nondangerous felons, or such other inmates who are determined by the sheriff or other chief correctional officer to not present a risk of escape or a threat to the staff, other inmates, or themselves.
(8) ASSISTANCE TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT.Upon the request of a sheriff, or the chair of the board of county commissioners in a county in which the chief corrections officer is not a constitutional officer, the Department of Corrections may provide technical assistance to local governments in the design and implementation of offender classification systems, evaluation of construction and financing alternatives, the development of community service programs, and the use of mutual aid programs in jail-sharing efforts.
(9) INMATE COMMISSARY AND WELFARE FUND.
(a) A commissary may be operated in the detention facility. If a commissary is established, then an inmate welfare fund shall also be established. The officer in charge will establish a procedure for providing commissary or canteen facilities or access to canteen items for the benefit of the inmate. The commissary or canteen shall not sell food that competes with the detention facility food program. It is recommended that inmates routinely carry no money and that a check-off system from their account be implemented. If money is permitted, a limit shall be set and all money in possession in excess of that limit shall be confiscated and deposited immediately in the inmate welfare fund, if there is one, unless it is needed as evidence in a trial or disciplinary hearing. If a detention facility does not have an inmate welfare fund, confiscated moneys shall be receipted and placed in the inmate’s personal property or inmate bank account. A shopping list shall be developed and printed for the information of all inmates with the prices and special conditions governing each sale shown clearly on such a list. Valuable items purchased by inmates shall be added to their personal property list after purchase and marked for identification.
(b) Canteen prices shall be set so as not to exceed the fair market value for comparable products sold in the community where the facility is located.
(c) Expenses involved in the commissary operation, including compensation for commissary employees and gratuities for inmates who may assist such employees, may be paid from the profit.
(d) Profits from the commissary shall be used for overall inmate welfare, and an inmate welfare fund committee shall recommend what expenditures are to be made. Activities of the committee shall be reviewed by the officer in charge who shall have final authority on expenditures. It is recommended that the jail chaplain be a member of the committee.
(e) The officer in charge shall be responsible for an audit of the fiscal management of the commissary by a disinterested party on an annual basis, which shall include certification of compliance with the pricing requirements of paragraph (b). Appropriate transaction records and stock inventory shall be kept current.
(10) It is a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083, for a county prisoner or a municipal prisoner in a county detention facility to knowingly, on two or more occasions, violate a posted jail rule governing the conduct of prisoners, if the rule prohibits any of the following acts:
(a) Assaulting any person;
(b) Fighting with another person;
(c) Threatening another with bodily harm, or any offense against another person or property;
(d) Extortion, blackmail, protection, demanding or receiving money or anything of value in return for protection against others to avoid bodily harm, or under threat of informing;
(e) Engaging in sexual acts with others;
(f) Making sexual proposals or threats to another;
(g) Indecent exposure;
(h) Escape;
(i) Attempting or planning escape;
(j) Wearing a disguise or mask;
(k) Setting a fire;
(l) Destroying, altering, damaging, or defacing government property or the property of another person;
(m) Stealing (theft);
(n) Tampering with or blocking any locking device;
(o) Adulteration of any food or drink;
(p) Possession or introduction of any explosive, ammunition, firearm, or weapon;
(q) Possession of contraband;
(r) Misuse of authorized medication;
(s) Loaning of property or anything of value for profit or increased return;
(t) Possession of anything not authorized for retention or receipt by the inmate and not issued to him or her through regular institutional channels;
(u) Mutilating or altering issued clothing, bedding, linen, or mattresses;
(v) Rioting;
(w) Encouraging others to riot;
(x) Engaging in or encouraging a group demonstration;
(y) Refusing to work;
(z) Encouraging others to refuse to work or participating in work stoppage;
(aa) Refusing to obey a reasonable order of any staff member;
(bb) Unexcused absence from work or any assignment;
(cc) Malingering; feigning an illness or injury;
(dd) Failing to perform work as instructed by a supervisor;
(ee) Lying or providing a false statement to a staff member;
(ff) Conduct which disrupts or interferes with the security or orderly running of the institution;
(gg) Counterfeiting, forging, or unauthorized reproduction of any document, article, or identification, money, security, or official paper;
(hh) Participating in an unauthorized meeting or gathering;
(ii) Being in an unauthorized area;
(jj) Failure to follow safety or sanitation regulations;
(kk) Using any equipment or machinery contrary to instructions or posted safety standards;
(ll) Failing to stand count;
(mm) Interfering with the taking of count;
(nn) Making intoxicants or being intoxicated;
(oo) Smoking where prohibited;
(pp) Using abusive or obscene language;
(qq) Gambling; preparing or conducting a gambling pool; possession of gambling paraphernalia;
(rr) Being unsanitary or untidy; failing to keep one’s person and one’s quarters in accordance with posted standards;
(ss) Tattooing or self-mutilation;
(tt) Unauthorized use of mail or telephone;
(uu) Unauthorized contacts with the public;
(vv) Correspondence or conduct with a visitor in violation of posted regulations;
(ww) Giving or offering any official or staff member a bribe or anything of value; or
(xx) Giving money or anything of value to, or accepting money or anything of value from another inmate, a member of his or her family, or his or her friend.

Punishment for a violation of this subsection shall run consecutive to any other sentence.

History.ss. 1-6, ch. 67-17; ss. 19, 35, ch. 69-106; ss. 1, 2, ch. 70-441; s. 2, ch. 71-113; s. 99, ch. 77-120; s. 117, ch. 79-3; s. 502, ch. 81-259; s. 1, ch. 83-33; s. 29, ch. 83-131; s. 17, ch. 85-288; s. 1, ch. 86-80; s. 1, ch. 86-235; s. 1, ch. 87-340; s. 78, ch. 88-122; s. 1, ch. 90-97; s. 28, ch. 91-225; s. 1, ch. 92-117; s. 46, ch. 93-39; s. 48, ch. 95-283; s. 31, ch. 96-312; s. 1880, ch. 97-102; s. 9, ch. 98-388; s. 3, ch. 99-361; s. 28, ch. 2000-157; s. 47, ch. 2010-117.
951.231 County residential probation program.
(1) Any prisoner who has been sentenced under s. 921.18 to serve a sentence in a county residential probation center as described in s. 951.23 shall:
(a) Reside at the center at all times other than during employment hours and reasonable travel time to and from his or her place of employment, except that supervisory personnel at a county residential probation center may extend the limits of confinement to include, but not be limited to, probation, community control, or other appropriate supervisory techniques.
(b) Seek and obtain employment on an 8-hours-a-day basis and retain employment throughout the period of time he or she is housed at the center.
(c) Participate in and complete the program required by s. 958.045, if required by the supervisor of the center.
(d) Participate in the education program provided at the center, if required by the supervisor of the center.
(e) Participate in the drug treatment program provided at the center, if required by the supervisor of the center.
(2) The center participating in the county residential probation program must provide or contract to provide for the programs established under subsection (1) as well as provide or contract to provide for necessary health care for the period of time the prisoner is housed at the center.
(3) A local government having an existing Department of Corrections probation and restitution center within its boundaries with current available capacity may contract with the Department of Corrections to house prisoners sentenced in accordance with s. 921.18.
(4) A local government having an existing Department of Corrections probation and restitution center within its boundaries without current available capacity, or a local government not having an existing Department of Corrections probation and restitution center within its boundaries, may provide facilities either through construction, purchase, or lease of new facilities or purchase, renovation, or lease of existing facilities.
(5) Local governments participating in this program may apply to the Department of Corrections for funding. The department shall allocate the funding for this program to the extent authorized in the General Appropriations Act.
History.s. 79, ch. 88-122; s. 1701, ch. 97-102; s. 48, ch. 2010-117.
951.24 Extend the limits of confinement for county prisoners.
(1) Any county shall be deemed to have a work-release program upon the motion of that county’s board of county commissioners which shall require the concurrence of the sheriff of the county.
(2)(a) Whenever punishment by imprisonment in the county jail is prescribed, the sentencing court, in its discretion, may at any time during the sentence consider granting the privilege to the prisoner to leave the confines of the jail or county facility during necessary and reasonable hours, subject to the rules and regulations prescribed by the court, to work at paid employment, conduct his or her own business or profession, or participate in an educational or vocational training program, while continuing as an inmate of the county facility in which he or she shall be confined except during the period of his or her authorized release.
(b) Any prisoner, at the time of sentencing or thereafter, may request the court in writing for the privilege of being placed on the work-release program. The Department of Corrections, upon the request of the court, is authorized to conduct such investigations as are necessary and to make recommendations to the court pertaining to the suitability of the plan for the prisoner and to supervise such prisoner if released under this program. Such a release may be granted by the court with the advice and consent of the sheriff and upon agreement by the prisoner. The court may withdraw the privilege at any time, with or without notice.
(c) No person convicted of sexual battery pursuant to s. 794.011 is eligible for any work-release program or any other extension of the limits of confinement under this section.
(3)(a) The wages or salary of prisoners employed under this program may be disbursed by the sheriff pursuant to court order for the following purposes in the order listed:
1. Board of the prisoner.
2. Necessary travel expense to and from work and other necessary incidental expenses of the prisoner.
3. Support of the prisoner’s legal dependents.
4. Payment, either in full or ratable, of the prisoner’s obligations acknowledged by him or her in writing or which have been reduced to judgment.
5. The balance to the prisoner upon discharge from his or her sentence, or until an order of the court is entered declaring that the prisoner has left lawful confinement, declaring that the balance remaining is forfeited, and directing the sheriff to deposit the funds in the general fund of the county to be spent for general purposes.
(b) The sheriff may collect from a prisoner the wages or salary earned pursuant to this program. The sheriff shall deposit the same in a trust checking account and shall keep a ledger showing the status of the account of each prisoner. Such wages and salaries shall not be subject to garnishment in the hands of either the employer or the sheriff during the prisoner’s sentence and shall be disbursed only as provided in this section.
(c) Every prisoner gainfully employed is liable for the cost of his or her board in the jail as fixed by the county. The sheriff shall charge the prisoner’s account, if he or she has one, for such board. If the prisoner is gainfully self-employed he or she shall deposit with the sheriff an amount determined by the court sufficient to accomplish the provisions of subparagraphs (a)1.-5., in default of which his or her privileges under this section are automatically forfeited.
(d) The board of county commissioners of any county may, upon the recommendation of the sheriff, authorize the person in charge of a county stockade or workcamp to implement paragraphs (a), (b), and (c), when such facility is not directly under the sheriff.
(4) Any prisoner who willfully fails to remain within the extended limits of his or her confinement or to return within the time prescribed to the place of confinement shall be deemed an escapee from custody and shall be subject to punishment as prescribed by law.
(5) Exchange for the purpose of work-release of county prisoners among other counties of the state that have implemented work-release programs is hereby authorized, with the concurrence of the sheriffs of the involved counties. For the purpose of this subsection, upon exchange, the prisoner shall be deemed a prisoner of the county where confined unless or until he or she is removed from extended confinement status. Prisoners from other jurisdictions, serving lawful sentences, may also be received into a county work-release program as above provided.
(6) In carrying out the purpose of this section, any board of county commissioners may provide in its annual budget for payment to the Department of Corrections out of funds collected from those being supervised such amounts as are agreed upon by the board and department to be reasonable and necessary. County judges are hereby authorized to levy $10 per month upon those supervised for purposes of paying for supervision under this act.
History.s. 1, ch. 69-143; s. 6, ch. 75-301; s. 100, ch. 77-120; s. 118, ch. 79-3; s. 3, ch. 83-274; s. 23, ch. 93-156; s. 1702, ch. 97-102.
Note.Former s. 948.07.
951.25 Sale of goods and services produced by county prisoners.
(1) Any service or item manufactured, processed, grown, or produced, in whole or in part, by county prisoners in a county operating under a home rule charter adopted pursuant to ss. 10, 11, and 24, Art. VIII of the State Constitution of 1885, as preserved by s. 6(e), Art. VIII of the 1968 revised constitution, and not required for use in the work program may be furnished or sold to any state agency, department, or institution; political subdivision of the state; other state; or agency of the Federal Government within the state or to the public.
(2) Any sale made under this section shall be in accordance with rules established by the governing body of such county.
History.s. 1, ch. 79-93.
951.26 Public safety coordinating councils.
(1) Each board of county commissioners shall establish a county public safety coordinating council for the county or shall join with a consortium of one or more other counties to establish a public safety coordinating council for the geographic area represented by the member counties.
(a)1. The public safety coordinating council for a county shall consist of:
a. The state attorney, or an assistant state attorney designated by the state attorney.
b. The public defender, or an assistant public defender designated by the public defender.
c. The chief circuit judge, or another circuit judge designated by the chief circuit judge.
d. The chief county judge, or another county judge designated by the chief county judge.
e. The chief correctional officer.
f. The sheriff, or a member designated by the sheriff, if the sheriff is not the chief correctional officer.
g. The state probation circuit administrator, or a member designated by the state probation circuit administrator, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
h. The chairperson of the board of county commissioners, or another county commissioner as designee.
i. If the county has such program available, the director of any county probation or pretrial intervention program, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
j. The director of a local substance abuse treatment program, or a member designated by the director, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
k. Representatives from county and state jobs programs and other community groups who work with offenders and victims, appointed by the chairperson of the board of county commissioners to 4-year terms.
2. The chairperson of the board of county commissioners, or another county commissioner as designee, shall serve as the chairperson of the council until the council elects a chairperson from the membership of the council.
(b)1. The public safety coordinating council for a consortium of two or more counties shall consist of the following members, appointed with the approval of each board of county commissioners within the consortium:
a. A chief circuit judge, or a circuit judge designated by a chief circuit judge.
b. A chief county judge, or a county judge designated by a chief county judge.
c. A state attorney, or an assistant state attorney designated by a state attorney.
d. A public defender, or an assistant public defender designated by a public defender.
e. A state probation circuit administrator, or a member designated by a state probation circuit administrator, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
f. A physician who practices in the area of alcohol and substance abuse, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
g. A mental health professional who practices in the area of alcohol and substance abuse, to be appointed to a 4-year term.
h. A sheriff or a jail administrator for a county within the consortium.
i. A chief of police for a municipality within the geographic area of the consortium.
j. A county commissioner from each member county of the consortium.
k. An elected member of the governing body of the most populous municipality within the geographic area of the consortium.
l. An elected member of a school board within the geographic area of the consortium.
2. The members of the public safety coordinating council shall elect a chairperson from among its members.
(2) The council shall meet at the call of the chairperson for the purpose of assessing the population status of all detention or correctional facilities owned or contracted by the county, or the county consortium, and formulating recommendations to ensure that the capacities of such facilities are not exceeded. Such recommendations shall include an assessment of the availability of pretrial intervention or probation programs, work-release programs, substance abuse programs, gain-time schedules, applicable bail bond schedules, and the confinement status of the inmates housed within each facility owned or contracted by the county, or the county consortium.
(3)(a) The council may also develop a local public safety plan for future construction needs. The plan must cover at least a 5-year period. The plan may be submitted for consideration to the local planning agency for the county, or the planning agency for each county within the consortium, at least 120 days before the adoption of or amendment to the comprehensive plan for the county by the local planning agency pursuant to part II of chapter 163.
(b) Each county, or county consortium, that contracts to receive community corrections funds for its community corrections programs under s. 948.51 shall require the public safety coordinating council to develop a comprehensive public safety plan as described therein which includes the future public safety construction needs as described in paragraph (a).
(4) The council may also develop a comprehensive local reentry plan that is designed to assist offenders released from incarceration to successfully reenter the community. The plan should cover at least a 5-year period. In developing the plan, the council shall coordinate with public safety officials and local community organizations who can provide offenders with reentry services, such as assistance with housing, health care, education, substance abuse treatment, and employment.
(5) All meetings of a public safety coordinating council, as well as its records, books, documents, and papers, are open and available to the public in accordance with ss. 119.07 and 286.011.
History.s. 2, ch. 87-340; s. 90, ch. 88-122; s. 16, ch. 91-225; s. 35, ch. 92-310; s. 7, ch. 93-204; s. 44, ch. 95-283; s. 32, ch. 96-312; s. 1881, ch. 97-102; s. 22, ch. 2010-64.
951.27 Blood tests of inmates.
(1) Each county and each municipal detention facility shall have a written procedure developed, in consultation with the facility medical provider, establishing conditions under which an inmate will be tested for infectious disease, including human immunodeficiency virus pursuant to s. 775.0877, which procedure is consistent with guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and recommendations of the Correctional Medical Authority. It is not unlawful for the person receiving the test results to divulge the test results to the sheriff or chief correctional officer.
(2) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, serologic blood test results obtained pursuant to subsection (1) are confidential and exempt from the provisions of s. 119.07(1) and s. 24(a), Art. I of the State Constitution. However, such results may be provided to employees or officers of the sheriff or chief correctional officer who are responsible for the custody and care of the affected inmate and have a need to know such information, and as provided in ss. 775.0877 and 960.003. In addition, upon request of the victim or the victim’s legal guardian, or the parent or legal guardian of the victim if the victim is a minor, the results of any HIV test performed on an inmate who has been arrested for any sexual offense involving oral, anal, or vaginal penetration by, or union with, the sexual organ of another, shall be disclosed to the victim or the victim’s legal guardian, or to the parent or legal guardian of the victim if the victim is a minor. In such cases, the county or municipal detention facility shall furnish the test results to the Department of Health, which is responsible for disclosing the results to public health agencies as provided in s. 775.0877 and to the victim or the victim’s legal guardian, or the parent or legal guardian of the victim if the victim is a minor, as provided in s. 960.003(3).
(3) The results of any serologic blood test on an inmate are a part of that inmate’s permanent medical file. Upon transfer of the inmate to any other correctional facility, such file is also transferred, and all relevant authorized persons must be notified of positive HIV test results, as required in s. 775.0877.
History.s. 13, ch. 88-380; s. 2, ch. 90-210; s. 16, ch. 93-227; s. 3, ch. 93-230; s. 8, ch. 94-90; s. 451, ch. 96-406; s. 38, ch. 97-93; s. 325, ch. 99-8.
951.28 Transmitting prisoner information to reduce public assistance fraud.Upon consultation with the Department of Law Enforcement and the Social Security Administration, the county sheriff or chief correctional officer or his or her designee shall establish and implement a process to submit to the Social Security Administration, directly or indirectly, sufficient and necessary information to identify incarcerated persons who are wrongfully receiving entitlement benefits and payments.
History.s. 50, ch. 96-312; s. 11, ch. 99-333.
951.29 Procedure for requesting restoration of civil rights of county prisoners convicted of felonies.
(1) With respect to a person who has been convicted of a felony and is serving a sentence in a county detention facility, the administrator of the county detention facility shall provide to the prisoner, at least 2 weeks before discharge, if possible, an application form obtained from the Parole Commission which the prisoner must complete in order to begin the process of having his or her civil rights restored.
(2) This section shall not apply to prisoners who are discharged from a county detention facility to the custody or control of the Department of Corrections.
History.s. 1, ch. 2006-174.
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