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The Florida Statutes

The 2002 Florida Statutes

Title XI
COUNTY ORGANIZATION AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Chapter 163
INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROGRAMS
View Entire Chapter
Section 163.3177, Florida Statutes 2002

163.3177  Required and optional elements of comprehensive plan; studies and surveys.--

(1)  The comprehensive plan shall consist of materials in such descriptive form, written or graphic, as may be appropriate to the prescription of principles, guidelines, and standards for the orderly and balanced future economic, social, physical, environmental, and fiscal development of the area.

(2)  Coordination of the several elements of the local comprehensive plan shall be a major objective of the planning process. The several elements of the comprehensive plan shall be consistent, and the comprehensive plan shall be economically feasible.

(3)(a)  The comprehensive plan shall contain a capital improvements element designed to consider the need for and the location of public facilities in order to encourage the efficient utilization of such facilities and set forth:

1.  A component which outlines principles for construction, extension, or increase in capacity of public facilities, as well as a component which outlines principles for correcting existing public facility deficiencies, which are necessary to implement the comprehensive plan. The components shall cover at least a 5-year period.

2.  Estimated public facility costs, including a delineation of when facilities will be needed, the general location of the facilities, and projected revenue sources to fund the facilities.

3.  Standards to ensure the availability of public facilities and the adequacy of those facilities including acceptable levels of service.

4.  Standards for the management of debt.

(b)  The capital improvements element shall be reviewed on an annual basis and modified as necessary in accordance with s. 163.3187 or s. 163.3189, except that corrections, updates, and modifications concerning costs; revenue sources; acceptance of facilities pursuant to dedications which are consistent with the plan; or the date of construction of any facility enumerated in the capital improvements element may be accomplished by ordinance and shall not be deemed to be amendments to the local comprehensive plan. All public facilities shall be consistent with the capital improvements element.

(4)(a)  Coordination of the local comprehensive plan with the comprehensive plans of adjacent municipalities, the county, adjacent counties, or the region; with the appropriate water management district's regional water supply plans approved pursuant to s. 373.0361; with adopted rules pertaining to designated areas of critical state concern; and with the state comprehensive plan shall be a major objective of the local comprehensive planning process. To that end, in the preparation of a comprehensive plan or element thereof, and in the comprehensive plan or element as adopted, the governing body shall include a specific policy statement indicating the relationship of the proposed development of the area to the comprehensive plans of adjacent municipalities, the county, adjacent counties, or the region and to the state comprehensive plan, as the case may require and as such adopted plans or plans in preparation may exist.

(b)  When all or a portion of the land in a local government jurisdiction is or becomes part of a designated area of critical state concern, the local government shall clearly identify those portions of the local comprehensive plan that shall be applicable to the critical area and shall indicate the relationship of the proposed development of the area to the rules for the area of critical state concern.

(5)(a)  Each local government comprehensive plan must include at least two planning periods, one covering at least the first 5-year period occurring after the plan's adoption and one covering at least a 10-year period.

(b)  The comprehensive plan and its elements shall contain policy recommendations for the implementation of the plan and its elements.

(6)  In addition to the requirements of subsections (1)-(5), the comprehensive plan shall include the following elements:

(a)  A future land use plan element designating proposed future general distribution, location, and extent of the uses of land for residential uses, commercial uses, industry, agriculture, recreation, conservation, education, public buildings and grounds, other public facilities, and other categories of the public and private uses of land. Each future land use category 1must be defined in terms of uses included, and 1must include standards to be followed in the control and distribution of population densities and building and structure intensities. The proposed distribution, location, and extent of the various categories of land use shall be shown on a land use map or map series which shall be supplemented by goals, policies, and measurable objectives. The future land use plan shall be based upon surveys, studies, and data regarding the area, including the amount of land required to accommodate anticipated growth; the projected population of the area; the character of undeveloped land; the availability of public services; the need for redevelopment, including the renewal of blighted areas and the elimination of nonconforming uses which are inconsistent with the character of the community; and, in rural communities, the need for job creation, capital investment, and economic development that will strengthen and diversify the community's economy. The future land use plan may designate areas for future planned development use involving combinations of types of uses for which special regulations may be necessary to ensure development in accord with the principles and standards of the comprehensive plan and this act. In addition, for rural communities, the amount of land designated for future planned industrial use shall be based upon surveys and studies that reflect the need for job creation, capital investment, and the necessity to strengthen and diversify the local economies, and shall not be limited solely by the projected population of the rural community. The future land use plan of a county may also designate areas for possible future municipal incorporation. The land use maps or map series shall generally identify and depict historic district boundaries and shall designate historically significant properties meriting protection. The future land use element must clearly identify the land use categories in which public schools are an allowable use. When delineating the land use categories in which public schools are an allowable use, a local government shall include in the categories sufficient land proximate to residential development to meet the projected needs for schools in coordination with public school boards and may establish differing criteria for schools of different type or size. Each local government shall include lands contiguous to existing school sites, to the maximum extent possible, within the land use categories in which public schools are an allowable use. All comprehensive plans must comply with the school siting requirements of this paragraph no later than October 1, 1999. The failure by a local government to comply with these school siting requirements by October 1, 1999, will result in the prohibition of the local government's ability to amend the local comprehensive plan, except for plan amendments described in s. 163.3187(1)(b), until the school siting requirements are met. Amendments proposed by a local government for purposes of identifying the land use categories in which public schools are an allowable use or for adopting or amending the school-siting maps pursuant to s. 163.31776(3) are exempt from the limitation on the frequency of plan amendments contained in s. 163.3187. The future land use element shall include criteria that encourage the location of schools proximate to urban residential areas to the extent possible and shall require that the local government seek to collocate public facilities, such as parks, libraries, and community centers, with schools to the extent possible and to encourage the use of elementary schools as focal points for neighborhoods. For schools serving predominantly rural counties, defined as a county with a population of 100,000 or fewer, an agricultural land use category shall be eligible for the location of public school facilities if the local comprehensive plan contains school siting criteria and the location is consistent with such criteria.

(b)  A traffic circulation element consisting of the types, locations, and extent of existing and proposed major thoroughfares and transportation routes, including bicycle and pedestrian ways. Transportation corridors, as defined in s. 334.03, may be designated in the traffic circulation element pursuant to s. 337.273. If the transportation corridors are designated, the local government may adopt a transportation corridor management ordinance.

(c)  A general sanitary sewer, solid waste, drainage, potable water, and natural groundwater aquifer recharge element correlated to principles and guidelines for future land use, indicating ways to provide for future potable water, drainage, sanitary sewer, solid waste, and aquifer recharge protection requirements for the area. The element may be a detailed engineering plan including a topographic map depicting areas of prime groundwater recharge. The element shall describe the problems and needs and the general facilities that will be required for solution of the problems and needs. The element shall also include a topographic map depicting any areas adopted by a regional water management district as prime groundwater recharge areas for the Floridan or Biscayne aquifers, pursuant to s. 373.0395. These areas shall be given special consideration when the local government is engaged in zoning or considering future land use for said designated areas. For areas served by septic tanks, soil surveys shall be provided which indicate the suitability of soils for septic tanks. By January 1, 2005, or the Evaluation and Appraisal Report adoption deadline established for the local government pursuant to s. 163.3191(a), whichever date occurs first, the element must consider the appropriate water management district's regional water supply plan approved pursuant to s. 373.0361. The element must include a work plan, covering at least a 10-year planning period, for building water supply facilities that are identified in the element as necessary to serve existing and new development and for which the local government is responsible.

(d)  A conservation element for the conservation, use, and protection of natural resources in the area, including air, water, water recharge areas, wetlands, waterwells, estuarine marshes, soils, beaches, shores, flood plains, rivers, bays, lakes, harbors, forests, fisheries and wildlife, marine habitat, minerals, and other natural and environmental resources. Local governments shall assess their current, as well as projected, water needs and sources for at least a 10-year period, considering the appropriate regional water supply plan approved pursuant to s. 373.0361, or, in the absence of an approved regional water supply plan, the district water management plan approved pursuant to s. 373.036(2). This information shall be submitted to the appropriate agencies. The land use map or map series contained in the future land use element shall generally identify and depict the following:

1.  Existing and planned waterwells and cones of influence where applicable.

2.  Beaches and shores, including estuarine systems.

3.  Rivers, bays, lakes, flood plains, and harbors.

4.  Wetlands.

5.  Minerals and soils.

The land uses identified on such maps shall be consistent with applicable state law and rules.

(e)  A recreation and open space element indicating a comprehensive system of public and private sites for recreation, including, but not limited to, natural reservations, parks and playgrounds, parkways, beaches and public access to beaches, open spaces, and other recreational facilities.

(f)1.  A housing element consisting of standards, plans, and principles to be followed in:

a.  The provision of housing for all current and anticipated future residents of the jurisdiction.

b.  The elimination of substandard dwelling conditions.

c.  The structural and aesthetic improvement of existing housing.

d.  The provision of adequate sites for future housing, including housing for low-income, very low-income, and moderate-income families, mobile homes, and group home facilities and foster care facilities, with supporting infrastructure and public facilities.

e.  Provision for relocation housing and identification of historically significant and other housing for purposes of conservation, rehabilitation, or replacement.

f.  The formulation of housing implementation programs.

g.  The creation or preservation of affordable housing to minimize the need for additional local services and avoid the concentration of affordable housing units only in specific areas of the jurisdiction.

The goals, objectives, and policies of the housing element must be based on the data and analysis prepared on housing needs, including the affordable housing needs assessment. State and federal housing plans prepared on behalf of the local government must be consistent with the goals, objectives, and policies of the housing element. Local governments are encouraged to utilize job training, job creation, and economic solutions to address a portion of their affordable housing concerns.

2.  To assist local governments in housing data collection and analysis and assure uniform and consistent information regarding the state's housing needs, the state land planning agency shall conduct an affordable housing needs assessment for all local jurisdictions on a schedule that coordinates the implementation of the needs assessment with the evaluation and appraisal reports required by s. 163.3191. Each local government shall utilize the data and analysis from the needs assessment as one basis for the housing element of its local comprehensive plan. The agency shall allow a local government the option to perform its own needs assessment, if it uses the methodology established by the agency by rule.

(g)  For those units of local government identified in s. 380.24, a coastal management element, appropriately related to the particular requirements of paragraphs (d) and (e) and meeting the requirements of s. 163.3178(2) and (3). The coastal management element shall set forth the policies that shall guide the local government's decisions and program implementation with respect to the following objectives:

1.  Maintenance, restoration, and enhancement of the overall quality of the coastal zone environment, including, but not limited to, its amenities and aesthetic values.

2.  Continued existence of viable populations of all species of wildlife and marine life.

3.  The orderly and balanced utilization and preservation, consistent with sound conservation principles, of all living and nonliving coastal zone resources.

4.  Avoidance of irreversible and irretrievable loss of coastal zone resources.

5.  Ecological planning principles and assumptions to be used in the determination of suitability and extent of permitted development.

6.  Proposed management and regulatory techniques.

7.  Limitation of public expenditures that subsidize development in high-hazard coastal areas.

8.  Protection of human life against the effects of natural disasters.

9.  The orderly development, maintenance, and use of ports identified in s. 403.021(9) to facilitate deepwater commercial navigation and other related activities.

10.  Preservation, including sensitive adaptive use of historic and archaeological resources.

(h)1.  An intergovernmental coordination element showing relationships and stating principles and guidelines to be used in the accomplishment of coordination of the adopted comprehensive plan with the plans of school boards and other units of local government providing services but not having regulatory authority over the use of land, with the comprehensive plans of adjacent municipalities, the county, adjacent counties, or the region, with the state comprehensive plan and with the applicable regional water supply plan approved pursuant to s. 373.0361, as the case may require and as such adopted plans or plans in preparation may exist. This element of the local comprehensive plan shall demonstrate consideration of the particular effects of the local plan, when adopted, upon the development of adjacent municipalities, the county, adjacent counties, or the region, or upon the state comprehensive plan, as the case may require.

a.  The intergovernmental coordination element shall provide for procedures to identify and implement joint planning areas, especially for the purpose of annexation, municipal incorporation, and joint infrastructure service areas.

b.  The intergovernmental coordination element shall provide for recognition of campus master plans prepared pursuant to s. 1013.30.

c.  The intergovernmental coordination element may provide for a voluntary dispute resolution process as established pursuant to s. 186.509 for bringing to closure in a timely manner intergovernmental disputes. A local government may develop and use an alternative local dispute resolution process for this purpose.

2.  The intergovernmental coordination element shall further state principles and guidelines to be used in the accomplishment of coordination of the adopted comprehensive plan with the plans of school boards and other units of local government providing facilities and services but not having regulatory authority over the use of land. In addition, the intergovernmental coordination element shall describe joint processes for collaborative planning and decisionmaking on population projections and public school siting, the location and extension of public facilities subject to concurrency, and siting facilities with countywide significance, including locally unwanted land uses whose nature and identity are established in an agreement. Within 1 year of adopting their intergovernmental coordination elements, each county, all the municipalities within that county, the district school board, and any unit of local government service providers in that county shall establish by interlocal or other formal agreement executed by all affected entities, the joint processes described in this subparagraph consistent with their adopted intergovernmental coordination elements.

3.  To foster coordination between special districts and local general-purpose governments as local general-purpose governments implement local comprehensive plans, each independent special district must submit a public facilities report to the appropriate local government as required by s. 189.415.

4.a.  Local governments adopting a public educational facilities element pursuant to s. 163.31776 must execute an interlocal agreement with the district school board, the county, and nonexempt municipalities, as defined by s. 163.31776(1), which includes the items listed in s. 163.31777(2). The local government shall amend the intergovernmental coordination element to provide that coordination between the local government and school board is pursuant to the agreement and shall state the obligations of the local government under the agreement.

b.  Plan amendments that comply with this subparagraph are exempt from the provisions of s. 163.3187(1).

5.  The state land planning agency shall establish a schedule for phased completion and transmittal of plan amendments to implement subparagraphs 1., 2., and 3. from all jurisdictions so as to accomplish their adoption by December 31, 1999. A local government may complete and transmit its plan amendments to carry out these provisions prior to the scheduled date established by the state land planning agency. The plan amendments are exempt from the provisions of s. 163.3187(1).

6.  By January 1, 2004, any county having a population greater than 100,000, and the municipalities and special districts within that county, shall submit a report to the Department of Community Affairs which:

a.  Identifies all existing or proposed interlocal service-delivery agreements regarding the following: education; sanitary sewer; public safety; solid waste; drainage; potable water; parks and recreation; and transportation facilities.

b.  Identifies any deficits or duplication in the provision of services within its jurisdiction, whether capital or operational. Upon request, the Department of Community Affairs shall provide technical assistance to the local governments in identifying deficits or duplication.

7.  Within 6 months after submission of the report, the Department of Community Affairs shall, through the appropriate regional planning council, coordinate a meeting of all local governments within the regional planning area to discuss the reports and potential strategies to remedy any identified deficiencies or duplications.

8.  Each local government shall update its intergovernmental coordination element based upon the findings in the report submitted pursuant to subparagraph 6. The report may be used as supporting data and analysis for the intergovernmental coordination element.

9.  By February 1, 2003, representatives of municipalities, counties, and special districts shall provide to the Legislature recommended statutory changes for annexation, including any changes that address the delivery of local government services in areas planned for annexation.

(i)  The optional elements of the comprehensive plan in paragraphs (7)(a) and (b) are required elements for those municipalities having populations greater than 50,000, and those counties having populations greater than 75,000, as determined under s. 186.901.

(j)  For each unit of local government within an urbanized area designated for purposes of s. 339.175, a transportation element, which shall be prepared and adopted in lieu of the requirements of paragraph (b) and paragraphs (7)(a), (b), (c), and (d) and which shall address the following issues:

1.  Traffic circulation, including major thoroughfares and other routes, including bicycle and pedestrian ways.

2.  All alternative modes of travel, such as public transportation, pedestrian, and bicycle travel.

3.  Parking facilities.

4.  Aviation, rail, seaport facilities, access to those facilities, and intermodal terminals.

5.  The availability of facilities and services to serve existing land uses and the compatibility between future land use and transportation elements.

6.  The capability to evacuate the coastal population prior to an impending natural disaster.

7.  Airports, projected airport and aviation development, and land use compatibility around airports.

8.  An identification of land use densities, building intensities, and transportation management programs to promote public transportation systems in designated public transportation corridors so as to encourage population densities sufficient to support such systems.

9.  May include transportation corridors, as defined in s. 334.03, intended for future transportation facilities designated pursuant to s. 337.273. If transportation corridors are designated, the local government may adopt a transportation corridor management ordinance.

(k)  An airport master plan, and any subsequent amendments to the airport master plan, prepared by a licensed publicly owned and operated airport under s. 333.06 may be incorporated into the local government comprehensive plan by the local government having jurisdiction under this act for the area in which the airport or projected airport development is located by the adoption of a comprehensive plan amendment. In the amendment to the local comprehensive plan that integrates the airport master plan, the comprehensive plan amendment shall address land use compatibility consistent with chapter 333 regarding airport zoning; the provision of regional transportation facilities for the efficient use and operation of the transportation system and airport; consistency with the local government transportation circulation element and applicable metropolitan planning organization long-range transportation plans; and the execution of any necessary interlocal agreements for the purposes of the provision of public facilities and services to maintain the adopted level of service standards for facilities subject to concurrency; and may address airport-related or aviation-related development. Development or expansion of an airport consistent with the adopted airport master plan that has been incorporated into the local comprehensive plan in compliance with this part, and airport-related or aviation-related development that has been addressed in the comprehensive plan amendment that incorporates the airport master plan, shall not be a development of regional impact.

(7)  The comprehensive plan may include the following additional elements, or portions or phases thereof:

(a)  As a part of the circulation element of paragraph (6)(b) or as a separate element, a mass-transit element showing proposed methods for the moving of people, rights-of-way, terminals, related facilities, and fiscal considerations for the accomplishment of the element.

(b)  As a part of the circulation element of paragraph (6)(b) or as a separate element, plans for port, aviation, and related facilities coordinated with the general circulation and transportation element.

(c)  As a part of the circulation element of paragraph (6)(b) and in coordination with paragraph (6)(e), where applicable, a plan element for the circulation of recreational traffic, including bicycle facilities, exercise trails, riding facilities, and such other matters as may be related to the improvement and safety of movement of all types of recreational traffic.

(d)  As a part of the circulation element of paragraph (6)(b) or as a separate element, a plan element for the development of offstreet parking facilities for motor vehicles and the fiscal considerations for the accomplishment of the element.

(e)  A public buildings and related facilities element showing locations and arrangements of civic and community centers, public schools, hospitals, libraries, police and fire stations, and other public buildings. This plan element should show particularly how it is proposed to effect coordination with governmental units, such as school boards or hospital authorities, having public development and service responsibilities, capabilities, and potential but not having land development regulatory authority. This element may include plans for architecture and landscape treatment of their grounds.

(f)  A recommended community design element which may consist of design recommendations for land subdivision, neighborhood development and redevelopment, design of open space locations, and similar matters to the end that such recommendations may be available as aids and guides to developers in the future planning and development of land in the area.

(g)  A general area redevelopment element consisting of plans and programs for the redevelopment of slums and blighted locations in the area and for community redevelopment, including housing sites, business and industrial sites, public buildings sites, recreational facilities, and other purposes authorized by law.

(h)  A safety element for the protection of residents and property of the area from fire, hurricane, or manmade or natural catastrophe, including such necessary features for protection as evacuation routes and their control in an emergency, water supply requirements, minimum road widths, clearances around and elevations of structures, and similar matters.

(i)  An historical and scenic preservation element setting out plans and programs for those structures or lands in the area having historical, archaeological, architectural, scenic, or similar significance.

(j)  An economic element setting forth principles and guidelines for the commercial and industrial development, if any, and the employment and personnel utilization within the area. The element may detail the type of commercial and industrial development sought, correlated to the present and projected employment needs of the area and to other elements of the plans, and may set forth methods by which a balanced and stable economic base will be pursued.

(k)  Such other elements as may be peculiar to, and necessary for, the area concerned and as are added to the comprehensive plan by the governing body upon the recommendation of the local planning agency.

(l)  Local governments that are not required to prepare coastal management elements under s. 163.3178 are encouraged to adopt hazard mitigation/postdisaster redevelopment plans. These plans should, at a minimum, establish long-term policies regarding redevelopment, infrastructure, densities, nonconforming uses, and future land use patterns. Grants to assist local governments in the preparation of these hazard mitigation/postdisaster redevelopment plans shall be available through the Emergency Management Preparedness and Assistance Account in the Grants and Donations Trust Fund administered by the department, if such account is created by law. The plans must be in compliance with the requirements of this act and chapter 252.

(8)  All elements of the comprehensive plan, whether mandatory or optional, shall be based upon data appropriate to the element involved. Surveys and studies utilized in the preparation of the comprehensive plan shall not be deemed a part of the comprehensive plan unless adopted as a part of it. Copies of such studies, surveys, and supporting documents shall be made available to public inspection, and copies of such plans shall be made available to the public upon payment of reasonable charges for reproduction.

(9)  The state land planning agency shall, by February 15, 1986, adopt by rule minimum criteria for the review and determination of compliance of the local government comprehensive plan elements required by this act. Such rules shall not be subject to rule challenges under s. 120.56(2) or to drawout proceedings under s. 120.54(3)(c)2. Such rules shall become effective only after they have been submitted to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives for review by the Legislature no later than 30 days prior to the next regular session of the Legislature. In its review the Legislature may reject, modify, or take no action relative to the rules. The agency shall conform the rules to the changes made by the Legislature, or, if no action was taken, the agency rules shall become effective. The rule shall include criteria for determining whether:

(a)  Proposed elements are in compliance with the requirements of part II, as amended by this act.

(b)  Other elements of the comprehensive plan are related to and consistent with each other.

(c)  The local government comprehensive plan elements are consistent with the state comprehensive plan and the appropriate regional policy plan pursuant to s. 186.508.

(d)  Certain bays, estuaries, and harbors that fall under the jurisdiction of more than one local government are managed in a consistent and coordinated manner in the case of local governments required to include a coastal management element in their comprehensive plans pursuant to paragraph (6)(g).

(e)  Proposed elements identify the mechanisms and procedures for monitoring, evaluating, and appraising implementation of the plan. Specific measurable objectives are included to provide a basis for evaluating effectiveness as required by s. 163.3191.

(f)  Proposed elements contain policies to guide future decisions in a consistent manner.

(g)  Proposed elements contain programs and activities to ensure that comprehensive plans are implemented.

(h)  Proposed elements identify the need for and the processes and procedures to ensure coordination of all development activities and services with other units of local government, regional planning agencies, water management districts, and state and federal agencies as appropriate.

The state land planning agency may adopt procedural rules that are consistent with this section and chapter 120 for the review of local government comprehensive plan elements required under this section. The state land planning agency shall provide model plans and ordinances and, upon request, other assistance to local governments in the adoption and implementation of their revised local government comprehensive plans. The review and comment provisions applicable prior to October 1, 1985, shall continue in effect until the criteria for review and determination are adopted pursuant to this subsection and the comprehensive plans required by s. 163.3167(2) are due.

(10)  The Legislature recognizes the importance and significance of chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, the Minimum Criteria for Review of Local Government Comprehensive Plans and Determination of Compliance of the Department of Community Affairs that will be used to determine compliance of local comprehensive plans. The Legislature reserved unto itself the right to review chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, and to reject, modify, or take no action relative to this rule. Therefore, pursuant to subsection (9), the Legislature hereby has reviewed chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, and expresses the following legislative intent:

(a)  The Legislature finds that in order for the department to review local comprehensive plans, it is necessary to define the term "consistency." Therefore, for the purpose of determining whether local comprehensive plans are consistent with the state comprehensive plan and the appropriate regional policy plan, a local plan shall be consistent with such plans if the local plan is "compatible with" and "furthers" such plans. The term "compatible with" means that the local plan is not in conflict with the state comprehensive plan or appropriate regional policy plan. The term "furthers" means to take action in the direction of realizing goals or policies of the state or regional plan. For the purposes of determining consistency of the local plan with the state comprehensive plan or the appropriate regional policy plan, the state or regional plan shall be construed as a whole and no specific goal and policy shall be construed or applied in isolation from the other goals and policies in the plans.

(b)  Each local government shall review all the state comprehensive plan goals and policies and shall address in its comprehensive plan the goals and policies which are relevant to the circumstances or conditions in its jurisdiction. The decision regarding which particular state comprehensive plan goals and policies will be furthered by the expenditure of a local government's financial resources in any given year is a decision which rests solely within the discretion of the local government. Intergovernmental coordination, as set forth in paragraph (6)(h), shall be utilized to the extent required to carry out the provisions of chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code.

(c)  The Legislature declares that if any portion of chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, is found to be in conflict with this part, the appropriate statutory provision shall prevail.

(d)  Chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, does not mandate the creation, limitation, or elimination of regulatory authority, nor does it authorize the adoption or require the repeal of any rules, criteria, or standards of any local, regional, or state agency.

(e)  It is the Legislature's intent that support data or summaries thereof shall not be subject to the compliance review process, but the Legislature intends that goals and policies be clearly based on appropriate data. The department may utilize support data or summaries thereof to aid in its determination of compliance and consistency. The Legislature intends that the department may evaluate the application of a methodology utilized in data collection or whether a particular methodology is professionally accepted. However, the department shall not evaluate whether one accepted methodology is better than another. Chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, shall not be construed to require original data collection by local governments; however, local governments are not to be discouraged from utilizing original data so long as methodologies are professionally accepted.

(f)  The Legislature recognizes that under this section, local governments are charged with setting levels of service for public facilities in their comprehensive plans in accordance with which development orders and permits will be issued pursuant to s. 163.3202(2)(g). Nothing herein shall supersede the authority of state, regional, or local agencies as otherwise provided by law.

(g)  Definitions contained in chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, are not intended to modify or amend the definitions utilized for purposes of other programs or rules or to establish or limit regulatory authority. Local governments may establish alternative definitions in local comprehensive plans, as long as such definitions accomplish the intent of this chapter, and chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code.

(h)  It is the intent of the Legislature that public facilities and services needed to support development shall be available concurrent with the impacts of such development in accordance with s. 163.3180. In meeting this intent, public facility and service availability shall be deemed sufficient if the public facilities and services for a development are phased, or the development is phased, so that the public facilities and those related services which are deemed necessary by the local government to operate the facilities necessitated by that development are available concurrent with the impacts of the development. The public facilities and services, unless already available, are to be consistent with the capital improvements element of the local comprehensive plan as required by paragraph (3)(a) or guaranteed in an enforceable development agreement. This shall include development agreements pursuant to this chapter or in an agreement or a development order issued pursuant to chapter 380. Nothing herein shall be construed to require a local government to address services in its capital improvements plan or to limit a local government's ability to address any service in its capital improvements plan that it deems necessary.

(i)  The department shall take into account the factors delineated in rule 9J-5.002(2), Florida Administrative Code, as it provides assistance to local governments and applies the rule in specific situations with regard to the detail of the data and analysis required.

(j)  Chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, has become effective pursuant to subsection (9). The Legislature hereby directs the department to adopt amendments as necessary which conform chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, with the requirements of this legislative intent by October 1, 1986.

(k)  So that local governments are able to prepare and adopt comprehensive plans with knowledge of the rules that will be applied to determine consistency of the plans with provisions of this part, it is the intent of the Legislature that there should be no doubt as to the legal standing of chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, at the close of the 1986 legislative session. Therefore, the Legislature declares that changes made to chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, prior to October 1, 1986, shall not be subject to rule challenges under s. 120.56(2), or to drawout proceedings under s. 120.54(3)(c)2. The entire chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, as amended, shall be subject to rule challenges under s. 120.56(3), as nothing herein shall be construed to indicate approval or disapproval of any portion of chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, not specifically addressed herein. No challenge pursuant to s. 120.56(3) may be filed from July 1, 1987, through April 1, 1993. Any amendments to chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, exclusive of the amendments adopted prior to October 1, 1986, pursuant to this act, shall be subject to the full chapter 120 process. All amendments shall have effective dates as provided in chapter 120 and submission to the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives shall not be required.

(l)  The state land planning agency shall consider land use compatibility issues in the vicinity of all airports in coordination with the Department of Transportation.

(11)(a)  The Legislature recognizes the need for innovative planning and development strategies which will address the anticipated demands of continued urbanization of Florida's coastal and other environmentally sensitive areas, and which will accommodate the development of less populated regions of the state which seek economic development and which have suitable land and water resources to accommodate growth in an environmentally acceptable manner. The Legislature further recognizes the substantial advantages of innovative approaches to development which may better serve to protect environmentally sensitive areas, maintain the economic viability of agricultural and other predominantly rural land uses, and provide for the cost-efficient delivery of public facilities and services.

(b)  It is the intent of the Legislature that the local government comprehensive plans and plan amendments adopted pursuant to the provisions of this part provide for a planning process which allows for land use efficiencies within existing urban areas and which also allows for the conversion of rural lands to other uses, where appropriate and consistent with the other provisions of this part and the affected local comprehensive plans, through the application of innovative and flexible planning and development strategies and creative land use planning techniques, which may include, but not be limited to, urban villages, new towns, satellite communities, area-based allocations, clustering and open space provisions, mixed-use development, and sector planning.

(c)  It is the further intent of the Legislature that local government comprehensive plans and implementing land development regulations shall provide strategies which maximize the use of existing facilities and services through redevelopment, urban infill development, and other strategies for urban revitalization.

(d)1.  The department, in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, shall provide assistance to local governments in the implementation of this paragraph and rule 9J-5.006(5)(l), Florida Administrative Code. Implementation of those provisions shall include a process by which the department may authorize up to five local governments to designate all or portions of lands classified in the future land use element as predominantly agricultural, rural, open, open-rural, or a substantively equivalent land use, as a rural land stewardship area within which planning and economic incentives are applied to encourage the implementation of innovative and flexible planning and development strategies and creative land use planning techniques, including those contained in rule 9J-5.006(5)(l), Florida Administrative Code.

2.  The department shall encourage participation by local governments of different sizes and rural characteristics. It is the intent of the Legislature that rural land stewardship areas be used to further the following broad principles of rural sustainability: restoration and maintenance of the economic value of rural land; control of urban sprawl; identification and protection of ecosystems, habitats, and natural resources; promotion of rural economic activity; maintenance of the viability of Florida's agricultural economy; and protection of the character of rural areas of Florida.

3.  A local government may apply to the department in writing requesting consideration for authorization to designate a rural land stewardship area and shall describe its reasons for applying for the authorization with supporting documentation regarding its compliance with criteria set forth in this section.

4.  In selecting a local government, the department shall, by written agreement:

a.  Ensure that the local government has expressed its intent to designate a rural land stewardship area pursuant to the provisions of this subsection and clarify that the rural land stewardship area is intended.

b.  Ensure that the local government has the financial and administrative capabilities to implement a rural land stewardship area.

5.  The written agreement shall include the basis for the authorization and provide criteria for evaluating the success of the authorization including the extent the rural land stewardship area enhances rural land values; control urban sprawl; provides necessary open space for agriculture and protection of the natural environment; promotes rural economic activity; and maintains rural character and the economic viability of agriculture. The department may terminate the agreement at any time if it determines that the local government is not meeting the terms of the agreement.

6.  A rural land stewardship area shall be not less than 50,000 acres and shall not exceed 250,000 acres in size, shall be located outside of municipalities and established urban growth boundaries, and shall be designated by plan amendment. The plan amendment designating a rural land stewardship area shall be subject to review by the Department of Community Affairs pursuant to s. 163.3184 and shall provide for the following:

a.  Criteria for the designation of receiving areas within rural land stewardship areas in which innovative planning and development strategies may be applied. Criteria shall at a minimum provide for the following: adequacy of suitable land to accommodate development so as to avoid conflict with environmentally sensitive areas, resources, and habitats; compatibility between and transition from higher density uses to lower intensity rural uses; the establishment of receiving area service boundaries which provide for a separation between receiving areas and other land uses within the rural land stewardship area through limitations on the extension of services; and connection of receiving areas with the rest of the rural land stewardship area using rural design and rural road corridors.

b.  Goals, objectives, and policies setting forth the innovative planning and development strategies to be applied within rural land stewardship areas pursuant to the provisions of this section.

c.  A process for the implementation of innovative planning and development strategies within the rural land stewardship area, including those described in this subsection and rule 9J-5.006(5)(l), Florida Administrative Code, which provide for a functional mix of land uses and which are applied through the adoption by the local government of zoning and land development regulations applicable to the rural land stewardship area.

d.  A process which encourages visioning pursuant to s. 163.3167(11) to ensure that innovative planning and development strategies comply with the provisions of this section.

e.  The control of sprawl through the use of innovative strategies and creative land use techniques consistent with the provisions of this subsection and rule 9J-5.006(5)(l), Florida Administrative Code.

7.  A receiving area shall be designated by the adoption of a land development regulation. Prior to the designation of a receiving area, the local government shall provide the Department of Community Affairs a period of 30 days in which to review a proposed receiving area for consistency with the rural land stewardship area plan amendment and to provide comments to the local government.

8.  Upon the adoption of a plan amendment creating a rural land stewardship area, the local government shall, by ordinance, assign to the area a certain number of credits, to be known as "transferable rural land use credits," which shall not constitute a right to develop land, nor increase density of land, except as provided by this section. The total amount of transferable rural land use credits assigned to the rural land stewardship area must correspond to the 25-year or greater projected population of the rural land stewardship area. Transferable rural land use credits are subject to the following limitations:

a.  Transferable rural land use credits may only exist within a rural land stewardship area.

b.  Transferable rural land use credits may only be used on lands designated as receiving areas and then solely for the purpose of implementing innovative planning and development strategies and creative land use planning techniques adopted by the local government pursuant to this section.

c.  Transferable rural land use credits assigned to a parcel of land within a rural land stewardship area shall cease to exist if the parcel of land is removed from the rural land stewardship area by plan amendment.

d.  Neither the creation of the rural land stewardship area by plan amendment nor the assignment of transferable rural land use credits by the local government shall operate to displace the underlying density of land uses assigned to a parcel of land within the rural land stewardship area; however, if transferable rural land use credits are transferred from a parcel for use within a designated receiving area, the underlying density assigned to the parcel of land shall cease to exist.

e.  The underlying density on each parcel of land located within a rural land stewardship area shall not be increased or decreased by the local government, except as a result of the conveyance or use of transferable rural land use credits, as long as the parcel remains within the rural land stewardship area.

f.  Transferable rural land use credits shall cease to exist on a parcel of land where the underlying density assigned to the parcel of land is utilized.

g.  An increase in the density of use on a parcel of land located within a designated receiving area may occur only through the assignment or use of transferable rural land use credits and shall not require a plan amendment.

h.  A change in the density of land use on parcels located within receiving areas shall be specified in a development order which reflects the total number of transferable rural land use credits assigned to the parcel of land and the infrastructure and support services necessary to provide for a functional mix of land uses corresponding to the plan of development.

i.  Land within a rural land stewardship area may be removed from the rural land stewardship area through a plan amendment.

j.  Transferable rural land use credits may be assigned at different ratios of credits per acre according to the land use remaining following the transfer of credits, with the highest number of credits per acre assigned to preserve environmentally valuable land and a lesser number of credits to be assigned to open space and agricultural land.

k.  The use or conveyance of transferable rural land use credits must be recorded in the public records of the county in which the property is located as a covenant or restrictive easement running with the land in favor of the county and either the Department of Environmental Protection, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, a water management district, or a recognized statewide land trust.

9.  Owners of land within rural land stewardship areas should be provided incentives to enter into rural land stewardship agreements, pursuant to existing law and rules adopted thereto, with state agencies, water management districts, and local governments to achieve mutually agreed upon conservation objectives. Such incentives may include, but not be limited to, the following:

a.  Opportunity to accumulate transferable mitigation credits.

b.  Extended permit agreements.

c.  Opportunities for recreational leases and ecotourism.

d.  Payment for specified land management services on publicly owned land, or property under covenant or restricted easement in favor of a public entity.

e.  Option agreements for sale to government, in either fee or easement, upon achievement of conservation objectives.

10.  The department shall report to the Legislature on an annual basis on the results of implementation of rural land stewardship areas authorized by the department, including successes and failures in achieving the intent of the Legislature as expressed in this paragraph. It is further the intent of the Legislature that the success of authorized rural land stewardship areas be substantiated before implementation occurs on a statewide basis.

(e)  The implementation of this subsection shall be subject to the provisions of this chapter, chapters 186 and 187, and applicable agency rules.

(f)  The department may adopt rules necessary to implement the provisions of this subsection.

(12)  A public school facilities element adopted to implement a school concurrency program shall meet the requirements of this subsection.

(a)  A public school facilities element shall be based upon data and analyses that address, among other items, how level-of-service standards will be achieved and maintained. Such data and analyses must include, at a minimum, such items as: the 5-year school district facilities work program adopted pursuant to s. 1013.35; the educational plant survey and an existing educational and ancillary plant map or map series; information on existing development and development anticipated for the next 5 years and the long-term planning period; an analysis of problems and opportunities for existing schools and schools anticipated in the future; an analysis of opportunities to collocate future schools with other public facilities such as parks, libraries, and community centers; an analysis of the need for supporting public facilities for existing and future schools; an analysis of opportunities to locate schools to serve as community focal points; projected future population and associated demographics, including development patterns year by year for the upcoming 5-year and long-term planning periods; and anticipated educational and ancillary plants with land area requirements.

(b)  The element shall contain one or more goals which establish the long-term end toward which public school programs and activities are ultimately directed.

(c)  The element shall contain one or more objectives for each goal, setting specific, measurable, intermediate ends that are achievable and mark progress toward the goal.

(d)  The element shall contain one or more policies for each objective which establish the way in which programs and activities will be conducted to achieve an identified goal.

(e)  The objectives and policies shall address items such as: the procedure for an annual update process; the procedure for school site selection; the procedure for school permitting; provision of supporting infrastructure; location of future school sites so they serve as community focal points; measures to ensure compatibility of school sites and surrounding land uses; coordination with adjacent local governments and the school district on emergency preparedness issues; and coordination with the future land use element.

(f)  The element shall include one or more future conditions maps which depict the anticipated location of educational and ancillary plants. The maps will of necessity be general for the long-term planning period and more specific for the 5-year period.

History.--s. 7, ch. 75-257; s. 1, ch. 77-174; s. 1, ch. 80-154; s. 6, ch. 83-308; s. 1, ch. 85-42; s. 6, ch. 85-55; s. 1, ch. 85-309; s. 7, ch. 86-191; s. 5, ch. 92-129; s. 6, ch. 93-206; s. 898, ch. 95-147; s. 3, ch. 95-257; s. 4, ch. 95-322; s. 10, ch. 95-341; s. 10, ch. 96-320; s. 24, ch. 96-410; s. 2, ch. 96-416; s. 2, ch. 98-146; s. 4, ch. 98-176; s. 4, ch. 98-258; s. 90, ch. 99-251; s. 3, ch. 99-378; s. 40, ch. 2001-201; s. 64, ch. 2001-279; s. 24, ch. 2002-1; s. 58, ch. 2002-20; s. 70, ch. 2002-295; s. 2, ch. 2002-296; s. 904, ch. 2002-387.

1Note.--As amended by s. 2, ch. 2002-296. The amendment by s. 70, ch. 2002-295, uses the word "shall."

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